5 Reasons Why My Garage Door Spring Broke

#1

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 1. Garage door springs do almost all of the work of lifting your door regardless of the door being manually or automatically operated. The spring makes it possible for anyone to lift a product that might weigh one hundred pounds on the low end and many hundreds of pounds on the high end. Not only can anyone lift it – most can do it with one hand! In other words, the garage door spring does a lot of work. 

#2

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 2. These springs do wear out over time – in fact, they are commonly rated with what is called a cycle life. The average standard cycle life is ten thousand cycles with each cycle being one opening and closing of the door. This means for a door that sees four cycles per day you might expect to replace your springs after somewhere close to seven years of use. 

#3

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 3. On an extension, or stretch type spring there is little you can do to extend the service life. On a torsion spring (the type that is wound on a bar rather than stretching out) you can help ensure a full cycle life by lightly lubricating the coils of the spring to reduce friction. 

#4

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 4. It is also important to note that extension springs sometimes do not break but rather ‘stretch out’. This is easy to spot as the space between coils when the door is closed is normally consistent. When the spring fails without breaking the space between the coils will become very inconsistent. This condition is quite visible and if it exists the springs should be replaced (Know when to call quits with your garage door).  

#5

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 5. Finally – always remember garage door springs are under extreme tension and can be dangerous if not handled properly. We always recommend service, adjustment or replacement be handled by a qualified professional.